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In respect of the dead: human remains in the British Museum

12 Jun

Originally posted on British Museum blog:

relevant image alt textAlexandra Fletcher, curator, British Museum

Mummy of a Priest of Amun and Bastet, named Penamunnebnesuttawy. Found at Thebes, Egypt, 25th-26th Dynasty, about 760-525 BC. (AES EA6676)

Mummy of a Priest of Amun and Bastet, named Penamunnebnesuttawy. Found at Thebes, Egypt, 25th-26th Dynasty, about 760-525 BC. (AES EA6676)

Mummy of a Priest of Amun and Bastet, named Penamunnebnesuttawy. Found at Thebes, Egypt, 25th-26th Dynasty, about 760-525 BC. (AES EA6676). Shown with coffin lid removed.

Mummy of a Priest of Amun and Bastet, named Penamunnebnesuttawy. Found at Thebes, Egypt, 25th-26th Dynasty, about 760-525 BC. (AES EA6676). Shown with coffin lid removed.

The most frequently asked question in the British Museum is almost certainly ‘Where are the mummies?’

Understandably the collections of mummified human remains are a great source of fascination for visitors and the Egyptian galleries are always busy. The current exhibition Ancient lives, new discoveries uses the latest CT-scanning technology to see within the mummy wrappings of eight individuals, providing incredibly detailed images of conditions that affected their lives and their treatment after death. It will surely be popular with visitors but these same visitors may not realise that the Museum cares for more than 6,000 human remains…

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5 Comments

Posted by on June 12, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

5 responses to “In respect of the dead: human remains in the British Museum

  1. dorannrule

    June 13, 2014 at 2:40 am

    Oh, the stories those mummies could tell and maybe some being revealed with the use of modern technology. As always, a fascinating look back in time Rita. What a huge responsibility for the museum to care for all those important historical remains.

     
    • ritaroberts

      June 16, 2014 at 4:56 pm

      I agree Dora, But I would love to work there myself. Thanks for taking the time to read.

       
  2. groovy historian

    June 15, 2014 at 7:27 pm

    omg this is amazing !!

     
    • ritaroberts

      June 16, 2014 at 4:57 pm

      Thank you for leaving a comment. This post is rather amazing as you say.

       
      • groovy historian

        June 16, 2014 at 4:59 pm

        indeed perhaps check my site out please :D stay groovy

         

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