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Cambridge University archaeologists find ‘oldest’ Roman irrigation system

22 Mar

Ancientfoods

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It is thought the beds would have been used to grow grapes or asparagus
Excavations at a Cambridge University development have revealed what archaeologists believe is Britain’s oldest-known Roman irrigation system.

Planting beds and pit wells were unearthed at the North West Cambridge site near Huntingdon Road.

Chris Evans from the university’s archaeological unit said they dated from between 70 AD and 120 AD.

It was an “unparalleled discovery” and “effectively the first irrigation system we’ve seen”, he said.

Excavations have so far uncovered evidence of settlements and habitation on the site from as early as the later Neolithic period, about 2800 BC to 2200 BC, to the Bronze Age, Iron Age, Roman period as well as more modern finds including World War II practice trenches.

‘New territory’
The team has been investigating how people through the ages adapted to living in an inland area away from main river valleys.

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Posted by on March 22, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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