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Monthly Archives: December 2014

Bringing a Ming painting back to life

A wonderful restoration of a Ming Painting.

British Museum blog

Jin Xian Qiu, Senior Conservator of Chinese Paintings and Carol Weiss, Conservator of Chinese Paintings, British Museum

On entering the BP exhibition Ming: 50 years that changed China, one of the first objects visitors see is a large silk painting depicting an official in front of Beijing’s Forbidden City. This Ming dynasty painting by artist Zhu Bang was conserved especially for the exhibition, using traditional Chinese scroll mounting techniques that have been passed down from master to student since before this 500-year-old painting was even painted.

The British Museum is extraordinarily fortunate to have as its Senior Conservator of Chinese Paintings Mrs Jin Xian Qiu, who originally trained and worked in Shanghai Museum before coming to the British Museum 27 years ago. It is thanks to her expertise that many of the Museum’s Chinese paintings can be displayed today. For this particular project, along with the help of her…

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Posted by on December 8, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

The Minoans and their Leisure Time.

Apart from their magnificent artwork, their religion and the many crafts they produced  the Minoans spent some of their leisure time taking part in sports activities such as, boxing, wrestling and bull leaping.

The bull leaping is believed to be in connection with bull worship.  In one type the leaper approaches the bull from the front, grabs the horns and somersaults backwards. This is a highly dangerous sport. It is possible the bull was sacrificed afterwards as part of a religious ritual.

The Famous Bull Leaping Frescoe.

The Bull leaping Fresco Knossos

Mycenaean Wman weaving

Minoan Woman Weaving.

From Charalambus Cave

The Minoans also loved music. These musical instruments were found in a cave burial on the Lasithi  Plateau Crete.

Knossos Board Game.

This is the famous Knossos Board Game. It is the ancient board game discovered by Sir Arthur Evans  in the Palace of Knossos and goes back to 1600 BC  It is a ‘ race game ‘, but at the same time something more. It portrays an ancient symbolism about life and the trip to Hades with a return back to life. A gap between the two parts of the board is supposed to represent the River-Ocean that separates the world of the living from the world of the dead.

 

 
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Posted by on December 6, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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