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Monthly Archives: November 2018

Chinese archaeologists discover 2,000-year-old liquor in ancient tomb

Ancientfoods

Photo taken on Nov. 7, 2018 shows the bronze pot containing the liquid unearthed from a Western Han Dynasty (202 BC to AD 8) tomb in Luoyang, central China’s Henan Province. Archaeologists on Tuesday poured liquid out of a bronze pot unearthed from the tomb into a measuring glass, giving off an aroma of rich wine.

original article:

Xinhuanet.com

ZHENGZHOU, Nov. 6 (Xinhua) — Archaeologists in central China’s Henan Province on Tuesday poured liquid out of a bronze pot unearthed from a Western Han Dynasty (202 BC to AD 8) tomb into a measuring glass, which gave off an aroma of rich wine.

“There are 3.5 liters of the liquid in the color of transparent yellow. It smells like wine,” said Shi Jiazhen, head of the Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology in the city of Luoyang.

He said the discovered content needs to undergo further lab research so the…

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Posted by on November 29, 2018 in Uncategorized

 

summer haiku d’été – so many stars = étonné par les étoiles

and here is another one. Enjoy !

Minoan Linear A, Linear B, Knossos & Mycenae

summer haiku d’été -  so many stars = étonné par les étoilesso many starsin the stray cat’s eyes,fireflies


stray cat starsle chat errantétonné par les étoiles, luciolesRichard Vallance

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Posted by on November 29, 2018 in Uncategorized

 

winter haiku d’hiver = the Canadian lynx – le lynx canadien revised – révisé

These Haiku by Richard Vallance are so lovely.

Minoan Linear A, Linear B, Knossos & Mycenae

winter haiku d’hiver = the Canadian lynx – le lynx canadien revised - révisé

lynxsnowstormthe lynx stalksinto the snow stormsnow hares in flightle lynx pourchassedans la tempête de neigeles lièvres s’enfuyantRichard Vallance

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Posted by on November 29, 2018 in Uncategorized

 

Newly Discovered Text: Caesar on Education and News in Finland

SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE

The following text, surmised to be a lost appendix to the well known De Bello Gallico, presents some general facts about education and fake news in Northern Europe for an audience of the Republic far removed from such mundane concerns. The previous section on forestry can be found here.

C. Julius Caesar (?), De Silvis. Edited by Dani Bostick.

1.5 In Finland schools are very different from prisons and for this reason seem rather unusual to foreigners. It is permitted to walk and play outside rather often so that teachers, who are considered to be almost gods and receive the greatest honor among their people, can keep students in a happy state of mind. When students learn, their bodies are calm not because they fear punishment or are asleep but because they delight in knowledge. They enjoy excellent lunches consisting of small fish, sausages, cheese, and fruit so that…

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Posted by on November 27, 2018 in Uncategorized

 

What to write with? Styli for clay tablets in the ancient Aegean and eastern Mediterranean

What to write with? Styli for clay tablets in the ancient Aegean and eastern Mediterranean

My research has taken a fun turn towards practical experiments lately, as some of our Twitter followers may have noticed. It isn’t just because I wanted to get away from the computer (though I did…); it’s because I have been working on a problem where direct evidence is scarce and/or difficult to interpret, and where experimentation is surprisingly elucidating.

1.jpg My work on a replica Cypro-Minoan tablet.

We know that during the Bronze Age a number of civilisations around the eastern Mediterranean were using clay to write on. From Mesopotamian cuneiform to Linear A and B in the Aegean, people found that this reusable natural resource provided a vital tool for making records. But they didn’t all use it in the same way, and they didn’t all use the same implements or methods to write on it – instead traditions of writing display considerable regional differences, whether or not there might…

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Posted by on November 25, 2018 in Uncategorized

 

Pottery Post Medieval (Part 3) For the collector.

For those of you who have been interested in my posts about collecting antiques, will know that up until now I have concentrated on pottery. Earlier posts covered the Medieval period.  Parts 1 and 2 and this one part 3 are for the post Medieval period.

THE STAFFORDSHIRE POTTERS. ENGLAND

The industrial area encompassing six towns  comprising of Tunstall, Burslem,Hanley, Stoke, Fenton and Longton make up  the city of Stoke – on – Trent in Staffordshire England and became the centre of ceramic production in the early 17th century . Many companies such as, Spode, Doulton, Wedgwood, Minton Aynsley and others produced decorative or industrial items. In this post I will talk about the well known Minton Pottery Manufacturing Company.

Minton’s was an independent business from 1793 – 1968 and popular during  Victorian times. As well as pottery vessels and sculptures Minton’s produced tiles and architectural ceramics. In 1765 -1836 Thomas Minton founded his pottery factory in Stoke- on – Trent Staffordshire England ” naming his company “Thomas Minton and Sons” producing earthenware. With regards to marks on pottery which I will come to later. This early earthenware produced by Minton was unmarked.

In 1769 Minton partnered with Joseph Poulsen making  “Bone China” c 1798. NOTE – ( little tip for the collector)  Minton’s early bone china was faintly greyish in tint and flawed with black specks. If you hold it up to the light you will see this.   Minton’s early products were mostly domestic blue transfer – printed table wares or painted earthenware including the popular willow pattern . Early “PORCELAIN” is marked with pattern numbers. Minton’s also produced some beautiful “MAJOLICA” wares. Also Parian Ware

Below you will see some Idea of items produced by Minton Pottery Manufacturing Company, as well as marks on the pottery to look for ,which will help to date the particular item you may be lucky enough to purchase.  Or you may have been lucky enough to inherit an item or items from family. Take a look in you Grandmothers loft.

Minton earthenware Vase c 1864

Minton Tile Aesop Fable c 1870.  Tiles make a wonderful collection and usually not too expensive.

Antique very early Minton Dinner plate Indian Tree design.

Minton Plaque c 1876

Minton mid 19th century Parian Ware candlesticks.

Minton Majolica

Minton Porcelain Victorian Lady c 1849

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on November 24, 2018 in Uncategorized

 
Quote

via Himera: One of the greatest archaeological discoveries of recent decades emerges from oblivion – The Archaeology News Network

Himera: One of the greatest archaeological discoveries of recent decades emerges from oblivion – The Archaeology News Network

 
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Posted by on November 24, 2018 in Uncategorized

 
 
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