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autumn haiku d’automne – the stone angel = l’ange de pierre

Minoan Linear A, Linear B, Knossos & Mycenae

autumn haiku d’automne – the stone angel = l’ange de pierrethe stone angelon her children’s tomb –infinity’s love

stone angell’ange de pierresur la tombe de ses enfants –l’amour infiniRichard Vallance

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Posted by on February 7, 2019 in Uncategorized

 

winter haiku d’hiver – mummy otter = maman loutre

Minoan Linear A, Linear B, Knossos & Mycenae

winter haiku d’hiver – mummy otter = maman loutre  blissfully floatingmummy ottercuddles her pup

mummy otter haiku 620flottante en délicemaman loutrecâline son bébéRichard Vallance

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Posted by on January 30, 2019 in Uncategorized

 

A very short introduction to the undeciphered Aegean writing systems

It's All Greek To Me

p1050285 (2) The Phaistos Disc – see below

Every so often a news article will make the rounds of the internet – or, for that matter, a paper will be published in an academic journal – presenting a new ‘decipherment’ of an undeciphered ancient writing system. Obviously, such decipherments have taken place in the past – probably most famously that of Egyptian hieroglyphs – and it’s certainly possible that more will take place in the future; but when it comes to the undeciphered writing systems of the Bronze Age Aegean, at least, there’s good reason to be extremely sceptical about any such claims of decipherment. This post is a quick guide to some key facts about the various related writing systems found in Bronze Age Crete and mainland Greece, starting with the one deciphered writing system, Linear B, and then surveying the undeciphered ones roughly in order of how much we know…

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Posted by on January 29, 2019 in Uncategorized

 

Translation of Linear B tablet KN 525 R l 24 by Rita Roberts

Minoan Linear A, Linear B, Knossos & Mycenae

Translation of Linear B tablet KN 525 R l  24 by Rita Roberts

linear b tablet kn 525 r l 24 knossosIt is to be noted that the supersyllabogram TE, which appears in the text tagged 2. refers to the Linear B word TETUKUOWA = tetu/xu#oa, which literally translated means “well prepared” or “ready”, in other words “finished”  cloth or textile, in this case “finished wool”.

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Posted by on January 28, 2019 in Uncategorized

 

ZULU: DEATH AND REDEMPTION IN THE AFRICAN SUN!

A magnificent but sad story. Please leave comments on the original post.

The Deadliest Blogger: Military History Page

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On 11 January 1879, a British Army crossed the Buffalo River, the boundary between the British Natal province and the independent native African kingdom of the Zulus. After the refusal by the Zulu king Cetshwayo of an insulting British ultimatum, a British army prepared to march on the Zulu capital, Ulindi with the goal of defeating and annexing the Zulu kingdom.

The Zulu War of 1879 was not officially sanctioned by the government of British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. It was instead the work of an ambitious colonial official, Sir Henry Bartle Edward Frere, High Commissioner for Southern Africa. In an effort to compel the various states of South Africa into a British confederation (which would be comprised of British-run Cape Colony, Natal, and the Boer republics of the Transvaal and the Orange Free State), Frere had initiated a policy of annexation of local African…

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Posted by on January 22, 2019 in Uncategorized

 

The Silence of the Girls – review

It's All Greek To Me

new doc 2019-01-21 20.32.30_1The Iliad tells the story of the Greek hero Achilles’ anger after Briseis, a woman he’s taken captive as his ‘prize’ after sacking her city, is taken away from him by Agamemnon, and the disasters that strike the Greek army after Achilles withdraws from the fighting over this slight. Briseis herself doesn’t feature much in the poem; she’s only mentioned ten times, and only speaks once, to mourn the death of Patroclus, who, she says, was kind to her after her capture by Achilles (19.282ff). Pat Barker‘s The Silence of the Girls (2018) gives us Briseis’ version of the Iliad: the story of the war told from the point of view of one of the many women who lose their homes, families, and freedom at the hands of the Homeric ‘heroes’. It’s a wonderful novel, beautifully written in mostly very simple language that manages to shift seamlessly…

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Posted by on January 22, 2019 in Uncategorized

 
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via The Legend of the Barkhamsted Lighthouse (update

FOR THOS OF YOU INTERESTED IN THIS FAMILY TREE PLEASE SEE THE END OF THIS POST FOR CHANGED INFORMATION AS TO WHERE TO CONTACT CONI DUBOIS

The Legend of the Barkhamsted Lighthouse (update)

 
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Posted by on January 21, 2019 in Uncategorized

 
 
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