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Monthly Archives: February 2016

Knossos tablet KN 281 R w 21 & the supersyllabogram RI = linen undergarment

Knossos tablet KN 281 R w 21 & the supersyllabogram RI = linen undergarment: This is perhaps one of the easiest supersyllabograms I have ever had to translate. It is pretty much self-evident. T…

Source: Knossos tablet KN 281 R w 21 & the supersyllabogram RI = linen undergarment

 
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Posted by on February 27, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

The composite supersyllabograms E & KO with the ideogram for horse in Linear B

The composite supersyllabograms E & KO with the ideogram for horse in Linear B: This is one of only two tablets in the entire corpus of Mycenaean Linear B tablets, on which two (2) supersyllabo…

Source: The composite supersyllabograms E & KO with the ideogram for horse in Linear B

This is a most complicated translation of a Linear B tablet, which deals with the Military Affairs at Knossos, by my teacher Richard Vallance. It is an example of that which I will come up against during my University Level. Gee I hope I can make it.  Thanks to my blogger friends for following my progress.

 
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Posted by on February 25, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

Earliest complete Bronze Age wheel found at Must Farm

Source: Earliest complete Bronze Age wheel found at Must Farm

More treasures from Must Farm

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

From Liverpool to London, the two ‘thoughtful and detailed’ major exhibitions telling stories of the Pre-Raphaelite | Culture24

Two collectors play key roles in the beautiful Pre-Raphaelite exhibitions currently being held at Liverpool’s Walker Art Gallery and Leighton House Museum in London.

Source: From Liverpool to London, the two ‘thoughtful and detailed’ major exhibitions telling stories of the Pre-Raphaelite | Culture24

 
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Posted by on February 22, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

History of the Battersea Shield

 

The Battersea Sheild

                                         THE         BATTERSEA      SHIELD

 

This beautiful Iron Age shield was dredged up from the Thames shortly before 1857, when it entered The British Museum collection. Several    ancient weapons and human skulls were also found, but the location was jealously guarded by workmen and antiquities dealers..

The picture shows the ornate metal facing from an Iron Age wooden shield, probably made in eastern England c 350-50 BC. It is an exceptional piece, made from sections of bronze sheet hammered out to less than 1mm thick. When new, it would have been a dazzling golden colour, with details on its round bosses picked out with red glass. The swirling designs suggest the faces of birds and beasts, which resolve into different creatures, some strange and menacing, depending on the angle from which the shield is viewed. The handle was adorned with an elaborate bronze mount that is now so fragile that it has to be kept in storage.

Many of the most important surviving pieces of Iron Age metal-work have been preserved by the curious ancient practice of casting them into rivers and lakes. In England this was largely restricted to a handful of east-flowing waters, such as the Thames. Yet the practice was shared by many communities  across Europe. Perhaps the most famous is the Swiss  lake site of La T’ene, which has produced so many decorated objects that the swirling designs of the later European Iron Age are often known as La T’ene art  The widespread nature of watery deposition and its long history suggest that water was important in ancient religious beliefs, and that the tools, armour and weapons left there were offerings to the gods.  Scientific analyses of ancient teeth and absence of fish bones at settlements also imply that protection in battle, but reconstructions have been used successfully in fights by re-enactors. Richly decorated Iron Age  armour and weaponry invites us to reconsider what warfare was  like 2,000 years ago. Battles and skirmishes probably involved intimidating the enemy with impressive visual displays as well as acts of physical violence. Ranks of elaborately equipped warriors would have created a frightening spectacle.

Iron Age Warrior

Iron Age Warrior.

The intricate designs on the  Battersea Shield extend even to the handle, which would have been hidden, suggesting the art on this object was more than just for show. Perhaps the design signified magical properties or religious meanings, offering the user power and protection. If so, then facing the owner of this extraordinary shield  in battle would surely have been a daunting prospect.

 
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Posted by on February 21, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

Tarkhan Dress confirmed as world’s oldest woven garment

Source: Tarkhan Dress confirmed as world’s oldest woven garment

A TRULY FASCINATING POST FROM THE HISTORY BLOG

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

Astronaut graffiti found in Apollo 11 command module

Source: Astronaut graffiti found in Apollo 11 command module

THIS POST IS COMPLETELY DIFFERENT FROM MY USUAL POSTS BUT  I THOUGHT MOST PEOPLE WOULD BE INTEREST  Enjoy !!

 
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Posted by on February 16, 2016 in Uncategorized

 
 
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